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Little Euparkeria into the Spotlight A Fresh Look at Euparkeria The fossilised remains of a little, lithe reptile that wandered South Africa during the Middle Triassic have come into the spotlight more than a hundred years after they were first scientifically described.  The fossils represent the taxon Euparkeria (pronounced Yoo-park-air-ree-ah) and they are regarded as highly significant in terms of
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When Tanystropheus Becomes Two New Study Solves Mystery of Tanystropheus A newly published scientific paper demonstrates that small specimens of Tanystropheus from the Middle Triassic Lagerstätte of Monte San Giorgio (Italy/Switzerland border), represent a separate species (Tanystropheus longobardicus) and that they co-existed with much larger examples of this genus (Tanystropheus hydroides).  Writing in the academic journal "Current Biology", the
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Fossil mystery solved: Super-long-necked reptiles lived in the ocean, not on land By CT scanning crushed fossilized skulls and digitally reassembling them, and by examining the fossils' growth rings, scientists were able to describe a new species of prehistoric sea creature. Tanystropheus hydroides, named after mythology's hydra, was a twenty-foot-long animal with a ten-foot-long neck.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/r....eleases/2020/08/2008


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Dinosaur relative's genome linked to mammals: Curious genome of ancient reptile Biologists have sequenced the genome of the tuatara, a lizard-like creature that lives on the islands of New Zealand.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/r....eleases/2020/08/2008


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Ancient mountains recorded in Antarctic sandstones reveal potential links to global events A new analysis of sandstones from Antarctica indicates there may be important links between the generation of mountain belts and major transitions in Earth's atmosphere and oceans. A team of researchers analyzed the chemistry of tiny zircon grains commonly found in the Earth's continental rock record to determine their ages and chemical compositions.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/r....eleases/2020/08/2008


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